Archive for November, 2008

Ah, Coitus!

Continuing our series of early dream comics, here’s the opening page of my adaption of Moe Howard’s dream in RARE BIT FIENDS #6.

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Merrily, Merrily, Merrily, Merrily

I had this dream right around the time Steve Bissette, John Rovnak and I went to a real life talk given by Stephen King. I took it as a warning.

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Dream Steam

Another early RARE BIT FIENDS strip.

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Out On A Dream Limb

Another dream comic, guest starring the famous comic strip detective. From RARE BIT FIENDS #5. Pen and ink, 1994.

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Can’t Play Fiends

As I was preparing to launch RARE BIT FIENDS in the high stakes game of the Direct sales Market, I had this prophetic dream. Pen and ink, 1994.

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Li’l Bits

Seeing as how I’ve got these nice scans on my hard drive of the RARE BIT FIENDS pages I contributed to the DREAM COMICS show at the Amadora BD Festival in 2005, let’s keep ’em coming for a few days. This page makes use of those fragments and images you pick up from dreams that don’t necessarily have narratives to go along with them. Pen and ink, 1995.

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Another Bit

Another dream comic from the mid-1990’s. This one doesn’t offer any famous cartoonists but seems to be about the movement of something huge and weighty buried deep in the psyche. Makes me smile to read it fifteen years after the fact. Ought to mention that you can pick up RABID EYE and my other dream comics collections, POCKET UNIVERSE and CRYPTO ZOO, by clicking right here.

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The Secrets Of Alan’s Brain

Above: a dream from RARE BIT FIENDS. Below: an introduction I recently wrote to an Italian reissue of Alan Moore’s WRITING FOR COMICS.

The Secrets Of Alan’s Brain
By Rick Veitch

Let’s face it. The odds are vanishingly small that you, or anyone else picking up this book, needs any kind of introduction to Alan Moore. It’s a foregone conclusion that you’ve already devoured every comic of Alan’s that you could get your mitts on and probably had your life changed by more than a few. You’ve been spellbound by his prose novel, mesmerized by his spoken word cd’s and busted a gut to see him on the Simpsons. And you’ve no doubt groaned your way through the ham fisted hatchet jobs Hollywood has made of some of his best work.
What you’re probably far more interested in is how the mind that conceived Marvelman, Swamp Thing, Watchmen, From Hell, Promethia, Lost Girls and all those other masterpieces, actually operates. You might very well have picked up this essential volume, in which Alan shares his approach to comic book writing, looking for some clues to what really makes him tick. Having had the good fortune to collaborate with the guy for 25 years, I get the question from comic book fans all the time. As a result of the constant requests, I’ve developed a pet theory on that very subject, most of which boils down to the fact that Alan Moore’s mind simply doesn’t work like most other people’s.

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